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Book Review – Sound and Fury – William Flaulkner

" Sound and Fury" is considered one of William Faulkner 's four most successful novels written on a dark theme...

by admin

Despite warnings about the difficulty of finding William Faulkner’s most famous novels, readers are still in complete shock when they read the first page of The Sound and the Fury.

Sound and Fury

Symbol of a conscious literary genre

This is the common feeling of many readers around the world when they want to read the 4 parts of this 400-page book. Why does this happen? Several novel characters from 3 generations of family and servants. In total, there are a dozen characters appearing in the story, which basically lasts 4 days. Compared to the famous Chinese literary masterpiece “Four Ages” or the immortal Russian epics “War and Peace”, “East”, etc., this American literary masterpiece can only be compared comparable. The equivalent of a long story.

But for anyone looking to explore the tumultuous and tumultuous world of William Faulkner, the time and effort it takes readers to understand the four chapters of The Sound and the Fury has presented an interesting challenge.

The art of flow of consciousness and the use of literal and irrational sentence structures have revolutionized the traditional prose techniques that narrative fiction has instilled in readers over time. Since a long time ago. W. a minute. Forget about the novelty and complexity of Faulkner’s writing style, let’s explore the story structure of The Sound and the Furious first.

The Sound and the Fury - Wikipedia

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Synchronized time structure and engaging internal monologue

This story is about a 3rd generation family: grandparents Jason Compson and Carolee and their 4 children. Quentin gave birth to their first daughter, Candice (Cady), and two sons: Jason, Maury, and Quentin’s grandson, Cady’s son. Murray suffered mental retardation after his youngest son, named Benji. This is an important character because the entire first chapter of the novel is written from this character’s point of view. Compson’s housekeepers are Rosbass, and Dillesley, and their children are Versh, Tippy, and daughter Front, they have a daughter named Luster.

The story is divided into 4 chapters and the time development is not in the usual sequence. April 7, 1928, beginning with Chapter 1, is also Benji’s 33rd birthday. Intellectual disability, unable to relate surrounding events to what they hear and feel. In the first person, my character Benjy’s soul is forever 3 years old, with only hearing, sight, smell, and touch.

In fact, readers should note that, for William Faulkner, the literary use of first-person stories is completely out of date, as the novel involves countless first-person jumps. to the third person. Personal pronoun, but it is not clear to whom.

To translate this work, many translators around the world have had a lot of trouble translating the monologue behind the three brothers Benji, Quentin, and Jason. It forces the reader to immerse themselves in the characters and really appreciate or experience all of the events of the story through their multiple perspectives. Excerpt from Benji’s monologue:

“ The tea smells like a tree. In the dark corner, I can see the window. I sat there in my slippers. Not seeing, but seeing with hands, hearing at night, hands seeing sandals but not seeing, hands seeing sandals, sitting and listening to it getting dark. 

The second chapter follows the last day of Quentin’s life, 18 years ago, on June 2, 1910, when he committed suicide at Harvard University. A whirlwind of jealousy and guilt swirled through his mind, and a series of images flashed by. If the reader only sees the reason for their one-sided love for his sister Cardi, it is very wrong. As we read the last page of the novel, we realize that Quentin has been on the edge of his heart since he was born in the House, just waiting for the chance to explode on that fateful day to self-destruct. His life is over.

Chapter Three takes the reader to April 6, 1928, a day before the release of Chapter One. This chapter continues the loneliness in the head of Jason, Quentin’s father, and Cardi’s younger brother, Benji’s brother. As you read this chapter, you will begin to clearly visualize the reason for the panicky screams in the first chapter, and the important role the Jason brothers played in the tragedy of the second chapter. A man who grew up in the same family as Compson exudes a stingy, selfish, cunning, and very aggressive personality.

William Faulkner The Sound and the Fury Made

It all culminates in the final chapter on April 8, 1928 (after Benji’s birthday), when Jason’s nature manifests in uncontrollable hatred and anger towards Quentin’s nephew ( who happens to be his son). Kadir’s sister. With his cunning, he deceived everyone inside and outside the Compson family, even his biological mother, who was always ready to protect and love him unconditionally.

Human personality and noble soul are always the long-term goals of literature.

The story is dark and full of artistic technique, metaphor, and common South American language. In that deep darkness, the discerning reader will recognize Disley, the Compson family’s black nanny. This can be considered as the image of the main character interspersed with the supporting characters, with many lines throughout all 4 chapters of the book. It was Mrs. Disley who led the Compsons’ ship of destruction. He appeared to protect the Compson children and fight Jason’s cruelty and crimes. In the words of his mother Caroline, Jason was “a family.” high expectations. “William Faulkner The Sound and the Fury Made

To fully enjoy this novel, readers need not hastily frown at dozens of pages without semicolons with mixed sentences. When encountering a scene of unknown people, do not be distracted but throw away books but randomly intertwine, confusing metaphors… forget what you have learned in school for a while. Grammar in literature such as sentence structure, paragraph, clause, subject, or predicate … in short, helps you understand the meaning of a passage. Instead, quietly let yourself drift with the flow of every sound, and let it take you somewhere no matter how winding the road. That place will understand it all.William Faulkner The Sound and the Fury Made

W Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury is a literary masterpiece, with 19 novels and 75 other short stories, for which he has won the prestigious Nobel Prize in Literature and 2 Pulitzer Prizes. The “voice” and “anger” expressed in the work are what can be said to be the stinging words of an idiot in the changing materialistic American society of the early 20th century. W. Faulkner expressed his views. about past and present, racial strife, prejudice against blacks, and their inferiority through new and innovative language.

However, no matter how dark and sad the story is, it always shows the noble image of a man of conscience and chastity that W. Faulkner created and admired.

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41 comments

Better Than Food September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Big thanks to Ridge for sending me this wallet and supporting the channel! Here’s the site if you want to check them out! > ridge.com/BETTERTHANFOOD

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stanbrown32 September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I enjoyed the video, but your characterization of Gone with the Wind as idealizing the Confederacy or the South is not really accurate. While the book does defend slavery and justify the restoration of white supremacy during Reconstruction, it actually shares some aspects of Faulkner. The novel presents Scarlett O'Hara as a New South figure–she is meant to represent Atlanta (she and the city were both christened in 1846), and her antics scandalize the older society ladies in the same way that Atlanta is said to contrast with the older, dowager-like cities of Charleston and Savannah. Scarlett wants to be a great lady like her mother, but she constantly sacrifices or abandons all the values of piety and charity that her mother had exhibited in the drive for financial success. Scarlett idealizes her family plantation, Tara, but she lives in Atlanta engaged in business enterprises (a store and then a lumber mill–employing convict labor in the mill even though she knows her foreman mistreats them). (And even the Old South is presented as not really an idealized picture of gentility and charm; Gerald O'Hara was no great aristocrat, but an Irish peasant who won his plantation and his first slaves in a poker game. He shares some characteristics with Thomas Sutpen.)

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Sherrie Phillips September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Your video popped up on my YouTube today. I thoroughly enjoyed your view and insights. In fact, I watched it twice to make notes as I have not read this yet. Thank you!

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Tadhg Cronin September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I really like your reviews but I can't watch them through until after I've read the book. I think Faulkner is just so amazing, I tried Absolom Absolom but had to postpone it and read Light in August instead. It's astonishing. I thought Cormac Mccarthy was going to be my absolute favourite writer, started with Blood Meridian, the border books but Sutree is so much more evocative and developed. The Sound and the Fury is next up.

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Gavin Ritchie September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Have you read Macbeth yet? You'd better have.

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TROCK754 September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Have read the book twice and listened to it 4 times. Never gets old…

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TROCK754 September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I love my Ridge Wallet have had it over 3 years.

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Hippo drome September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Faulkner's intros are so cinematographical, really absorbing the reader into the world. If you ever read Light in August maybe you could relate the feel of each of the four novels to particular film directors' works. For example, the intro of As I Lay Dying, deadpan Jewel through footsteps rustling, the gourd and stream, them moving uphill and then Cash sawing, sounds weaving in and out of silence, very cinematic and maybe pastoral and rugged. S&F seems much mellower, like soft twilight hanging between day and night. Ligh in August begins cinematically but gets gritty. Haven't read Absalom Absalom yet. I cant do it because i only watch movies like Kung Fu Hustle and Godzilla vs Kong unless someone makes me watch som other kind of film.

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TheWhitehiker September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Obtuse analysis–couldn't get beyond 9.00 or so.

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Riles Kiley September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

When I lived in Oxford, I used to drink with Faulkner at his grave. I’d pour some out for him. His wife, a non drinker, buried next to him I let alone, sometimes just gave her a flower.

His home, Roanoke, is really cool. I never went inside, but he’s got this amazing landscape with willows you can nook up into and read.

I wasn’t into literature then. I just admired him. I was attending school at Ole Miss.
I’d only ever spark noted “As I lay dying” in high school. I’m immersing myself into The Sound and the Fury now, thanks Cliff!

Oh another funny memory about his grave, aside from the bottles of whiskey people leave on his grave, I found one English student had graded one of his stories for grammatical errors and lol oh man…harsh

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Henry McClellan September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

just finished reading this book. it was so full of depth you're right. i had to read chapter 1 before reading the last chapter, which was so worth it. benjy seems to live entirely outside of time, and the only one who understands the family in a way, in an ineluctable sort of way. chapter two brings me to tears, gorgeous, need to take a second pass through it. beautiful beautiful beautiful novel

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Adriana September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

You were amazing with mustache! Iconic…😘

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tigerboy1966 September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

The thing about TSATF is that you should not give up. The first section is very hard going but the book gets progressively more readable. And it's worth it. BTW did anyone else think that the male Quentin Compson was gay? The problem that most of the characters have is that they cannot love.

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Harry Pollock September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Hahaha lmao I was rooting for Jason at the end. I knew he was the worst. But watching this I only realised how bad I feel haha
I completely understood when he desired to get stuck inbetween towns in the rain.

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Luciano Rocha September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Although not my favorite writer, in my humble conception I believe William Faulkner📕🖋 is the most prominent writer in the United States🇺🇸!

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Jojo dogface September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

ive never seen someone more resemble the person they're talking about. i feel like i just watched william faulkner talk about william faulkner.

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Meester_James September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I just had a landmark realization, thank you @BetterThanFood. The book "The Family Golovlyov" is very the Russian version of this family, and I hadn't made the parallels until I saw this review. Perhaps it is more nihilistic and without any sort of protagonist, but clearly the descent and collapse of a Russian family in the same way this is about the South.
Thank you SOOOO Much for making this review. I read Sound+Fury probably 12-15 years ago and it really sticks with me quite strongly, I should have a re-read sometime soon.

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Tanya K September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I read it last year november (hope I'd seen your review then), I'm 15 and I'm confident the subtleties (also most of the book pretty sure) went completely over my head, but its been my favourite book ever since. The atmosphere created is unbelievable, even while reading the incoherent thoughts of Benji, you can still feel the sinister and morbid atmosphere. The chapter with Quentin hit hardest. It was haunting, as the punctuations gradually disappeared and his mind got progressively disoriented…oof. I know stream of consciousness is a popular format but I'd never read anything like that before. Hopefully I'll read it when I'm older and not stupid to understand more

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Amit Roy September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Arthur Shelby reviews William Faulkner.

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Jack Bennett September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I love your videos, I'm so glad I found your channel! A book I think you'd really enjoy is 'Nightwood' by Djuna Barns. I think you'd get a lot out of it!

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Montez Mahal September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Cliff is more entertaining than anything I have ever read-certainly more interesting!

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stephen pain September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Thumbs up – love your summation of this novel which is one of Faulkner's best – I like his "Wild Palms"

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Michael Hammerschmidt September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

In Highschool my Ap English teacher told a story of how she once found Faulkner's journal when researching for an essay on The Sound and the Fury in college. In it Faulkner described a man that he used to interview. Out on his porch in the evenings, after downing a few bottles, he would just talk about his family. I can't quite remember the details that tipped her off but she felt the man has some striking similarities to her great-grandfather. Eventually she brought it to her mom and aunt to see if they knew anything. They told her they had a feeling she would find out eventually. Apparently Faulkner would come by from time to time to chat with her Great Grandfather and listen to his stories. I guess her Mom and Aunt were rather ashamed to admit that Faulkner was at least partially inspired by their family to write The Sound and the Fury.

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inouesora September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

okay. one more review, and i'll get back to reading Justine.

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john flynn September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Please review Child of God by cormac mccarthy

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PriorityStrength September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I committed to reading more fiction this year and found The Sound and the Fury on my bookshelf knowing nothing about it other than "Faulkner… that's a classic, right?". Surprise, surprise, it was a rather big bite for my first real attempt at literature in… far too long. But hey, it's how I found your channel! Cheers from a fellow Portland resident!

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Herr Klamm September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Always reminds me of a young Arthur Morgan.

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BlueBaboon September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Hey Cliff, idk if you read your comments but it would be nice to have AILD next. My introduction to Faulkner and remains my favorite after reading the wild palms, soldier’s pay, rose for Emily, and go down Moses

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3mate1 September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Union men boiled coffee at every halt om the march, if they couldn't brew it they chewed the grounds like tobacco. 😉

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Drew Hargrove September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

"So I, who had never had a sister and was fated to lose my daughter in infancy, set out to make myself a beautiful and tragic little girl." ~William Faulkner, in the introduction

Sometimes, all it takes is one sentence to make an impact.

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Jay Gatsby September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I just finished this book about ten minutes ago and absolutely despised it.

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KasianFrånMitja September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

which part is it when jason holds quentin out of the car? Which page?

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Teddy Dog September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Ok well done. You didn't do it alone but you at last persuaded me to read Faulkner. They way I came to learn to love Bob Dylan was to stop trying to interpret what he says and simply take it literally and go from their. Faulkner sounds like he calls for the same approach. Stop worrying and read. I like dark and twisted tales, particularly Southern ones, and know I'm missing out on Faulkner. I'm fixing that.

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choggerboom September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Just finished this ride. My God. Read this. My advice for first time readers, once you course through the midway point it will all begin to fall in place. Everything you thought was nonsensical comes into clarity. Genius, genius novel. Experience it for its genius.

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Kannot September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

You allowed me to read books I never thought I would, and I'm so grateful. Thank you for this!!!

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A Life Worth Finding September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

Everytime your vids show up in my feed I end up watching till the end . It's time well spent . I feel your reviews are the most thorough on YouTube. You pack a bunch of summary in a short amount of time .

I'd personally like you to review a book The Orphan Masters Son , it's a book I think you'd like . I think it would make for a good review 🤔

Thanks for helping to keep the power of books alive .

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Mary Salmon September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

i am reading absalom absalom right now because of your review.

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KasianFrånMitja September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

who dislikes this? If u wouldnt like the things being said, u could still appriciate the cheer passion of it…. I however loved it! Great review Cliff!

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StrawberryFeels September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

This is a great review of a great novel. Your videos are a pleasure to watch.

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Rayan Knezic September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

I hope you review gravity's rainbow soon. I want to get back into it… But man, it was confusing

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Shaun Nortje September 21, 2022 - 12:43 am

SANCTION-THE BOOK

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